How DNRS is Helping Me Heal from Lyme Disease

Dynamic Neural Retraining System for Lyme Disease Healing

I’m really excited to tell you about a program that’s made a huge difference in my life as I’ve worked toward healing from chronic illness. Of all the forms of treatment I’ve tried, including both traditional and naturopathic medicine, this is the one thing that’s created the most significant shifts!

The treatment that’s helping me heal is called the Dynamic Neural Retraining System.

What is the Dynamic Neural Retraining System?

The Dynamic Neural Retraining System is a drug free, neuroplasticity-based healing approach to rewire chronic illness disease patterns in the brain as seen in Chemical Sensitivities, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia and many other chronic illnesses. It was developed by Annie Hopper, a counselor and chronic illness suffer who rewired her own brain as the means to overcome chronic illness.

In the DVD program, Annie shares her neuroplasticity research and the entire program, which is full of tools to help those suffering from chronic illness regain their health.

Who Can DNRS Help?

According to the Dynamic Neural Retraining System’s website, it can provide relief from: Adrenal Fatigue, Allergies (pollen, food, perfume, chemical, environmental), Anxiety, Asthma, Centralized Sensitivity Syndrome, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic Pain, Cognitive Function – memory or brain fog, Depression, Dysautonomia, Electric Hypersensitivity Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, Food Sensitivities, Gulf War Syndrome, Headaches, Heavy Metal Toxicity, Insomnia, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Leaky Gut Syndrome, Lyme Disease, Mold Toxicity, Multiple Chemical Sensitivity, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Panic Attacks, Parkinson’s Disease, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome, Skin Conditions – eczema, rash, hives.

Read more

Emily Lofgren’s heart beats for authenticity. She craves true connection where we can be real about our struggles and find hope together. Emily became a Christian in college and since then has had a passion for writing in a way that helps others encounter life. Grab your free copy of her eBook Finding Hope Through the Fog.

A Day in the Life of a Lyme Disease Patient

A Day in the Life of a Lyme Disease Patient

Something I find fascinating about life with Lyme Disease is that it looks different for each person. Each person uses different treatment protocols. Our routines change regularly as we add or take away various forms of treatment.

Some of us Lyme Disease patients work outside the home while others are not able to work. I’ve experienced many forms of working while treating Lyme. At some points, I worked full time. Other times, I did work for a full time job from home when I wasn’t well enough to be in the office. During the worst months with Lyme, I was mostly bedridden,homebound, and unable to work. Now I work part time and also do some other work from home.

I decided to document a day of my life while treating Chronic Lyme Disease to give you a glimpse into my life.

This particular day was off to a later, slower start after being unable to get quality sleep during the night. This was one of the more productive days. In the past, before making more progress with my health, I wasn’t able to do much reading or work on the computer. Now, on the better days, I’m able to do a lot more. Each day is different. Some days I exercise. Other days I need more time in bed. Some days I’m alone all day. Other days, my fiancé, Jonathan comes over. This is an average day in my life as I treat Lyme Disease and work on writing/blogging projects.

Read more

Emily Lofgren’s heart beats for authenticity. She craves true connection where we can be real about our struggles and find hope together. Emily became a Christian in college and since then has had a passion for writing in a way that helps others encounter life. Grab your free copy of her eBook Finding Hope Through the Fog.

5 Ways to Enjoy Thanksgiving with Lyme Disease

Thanksgiving and Chronic Illness

When you’re sick with Chronic Lyme Disease, everything in life can be a little overwhelming!

I know how it goes.

I’ve been there.

Some days, I’m still there.

There’s so much to think through, plan, and do to keep symptoms under control. And even then, it can be a tossup as to whether treatment is actually going to make you feel better. A lot of times, you feel worse before you feel better because of Herxheimer Reactions. It’s tough (to say the least)!

So normal things like celebrating Thanksgiving with your family or friends can seem daunting. If you had previously been the one to host the festivities, the idea of cooking, cleaning, and opening your home for others can be enough to cause panic. If you usually travel for Thanksgiving, that can add another layer of challenges.

No matter what kind of Thanksgiving plans you usually partake in, I’ve put together a short list of things to help you to enjoy Thanksgiving while you live with Lyme Disease.

Read more

Emily Lofgren’s heart beats for authenticity. She craves true connection where we can be real about our struggles and find hope together. Emily became a Christian in college and since then has had a passion for writing in a way that helps others encounter life. Grab your free copy of her eBook Finding Hope Through the Fog.

The Blessing of Delayed Gratification

Future Jonathan and Emily Ryan

We live in a culture where instant access is expected.

We have the ability to obtain knowledge about almost anything right at our fingertips.

If we’re hungry, it doesn’t take more than a swing though the fast food drive thru to curb our cravings.

Waiting is begrudged.

We think we should be able to satisfy our desires at all costs. Any time we can’t immediately obtain what we want, it feels like we’re experiencing something burdensome.

While this is the norm of society at large, it doesn’t make it the best thing for us.

Sure, there are major benefits to being able to do things more efficiently. I love productive systems as much as the next person. Organization means I can better enjoy time with the people I love.

But even with the benefits of new technology and quick access, there are negative consequences for us as people.

Read more

Emily Lofgren’s heart beats for authenticity. She craves true connection where we can be real about our struggles and find hope together. Emily became a Christian in college and since then has had a passion for writing in a way that helps others encounter life. Grab your free copy of her eBook Finding Hope Through the Fog.

Let’s Find Hope Amidst Chronic Illness

Christian Chronic Illness Resources

Hello there, sweet reader!

I want you to know that I am so glad you are here!

Since our community has been growing in recent months, I wanted to write a blog post that tells a little bit more of the heart behind the writing on this site.

My name is Emily Lofgren. I’m 26 years old, and I am currently treating Lyme Disease, co-infections, Pyroluria, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, and more. Life with chronic illness has been a hard journey for me. I’ve hard periods of times when I wanted to give up, but there was always this deeper, lasting hope within me as the Holy Spirit worked to keep me aware of His presence.

I am a Christian. I love the Lord and desire for my life to reflect Christ. My goal in writing here is to help others who are facing similar life experiences with chronic illness. I want those who are hurting to know that they are not alone and that the Lord will meet them in the midst of the pain.

A little over a year ago, I released an eBook called Finding Hope Through the Fog. It shares about my struggles with chronic illness and what it meant to turn to God when it felt like things are hopeless. I’d love to give you a free copy!

Read more

Emily Lofgren’s heart beats for authenticity. She craves true connection where we can be real about our struggles and find hope together. Emily became a Christian in college and since then has had a passion for writing in a way that helps others encounter life. Grab your free copy of her eBook Finding Hope Through the Fog.