When Your Body Cries “Rest” but You Want to Keep Going

When Your Body Needs Rest With Chronic Illness

I’m not naturally someone who likes rest.

Some people like to take naps and lounge. I often wish I were like them! It would be nice to be able to focus on a Netflix marathon without getting the itch to go do something else. It would be great to be free of thinking of the next thing I would like to be doing.

I don’t mind curling up in a blanket on the couch, but I’d rather be reading a book than watching a movie. If not reading, I would prefer to be writing or brainstorming for a new project. I am all for being cozy, but I like to do it with purpose.

Many days, I wish that resting came naturally to me – that I was someone who could easily watch hour after hour of TV shows to pass the time. When I feel miserable from the pain, fatigue, and brain fog that come from managing several chronic illnesses, I would love to just veg out on the couch and enjoy it!

I’m not a good rester because I desperately want to be doing something. I like to be involved in activities. I like doing work that matters, and I am not very good at stopping.

Have you ever felt this way?

What happens when those of us with chronic illnesses have great intentions but the illnesses we face stop us in our tracks?

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Emily Lofgren’s heart beats for authenticity. She craves true connection where we can be real about our struggles and find hope together. Emily became a Christian in college and since then has had a passion for writing in a way that helps others encounter life. Grab your free copy of her eBook Finding Hope Through the Fog.

The Good and Bad of Support Groups for Chronic Illnesses

The Good and Bad of Support Groups for Chronic Illnesses

When I was first diagnosed with several chronic conditions, I felt lost and alone. It felt like nobody in my life understood what I was going through.

They tried.

I had a lot of well-meaning friends, but at the end of the day they just didn’t have the background to understand the magnitude of what I was experiencing.

So, to feel a little less alone, I turned to online support groups.

On Facebook, there are hundreds of groups for those suffering from chronic illnesses. I joined the groups and started reading about others’ experiences. Members of these groups got me. They could relate to what I was going through. While our symptoms may have been different, our experiences often looked similar. We each were facing some level of debilitation. Chronic illness was changing our lives.

After a while, though, being part of Facebook support groups began to grow draining. I’d see posts pop up in my newsfeed when I was just trying to think about other things. Sometimes, the discussions would bring down my mood. What, at first, was a place of support seemed to turn into a place that drug me down.

I thought about leaving all of the groups. I thought about not talking about illness anymore and just avoiding the subject altogether. But, still, I felt this sense of calling from God to connect with others who are suffering to help bring a little hope. It didn’t make sense for me to completely leave the groups when I desired to help encourage others. It was also good for me to keep learning about what others do for treatment so I can make educated decisions when talking with my doctor.

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Emily Lofgren’s heart beats for authenticity. She craves true connection where we can be real about our struggles and find hope together. Emily became a Christian in college and since then has had a passion for writing in a way that helps others encounter life. Grab your free copy of her eBook Finding Hope Through the Fog.

What To Do If You Think You Have Lyme Disease

What to Do if You Think You Have Lyme Disease

If your health is in a place where you think it’s possible you have Lyme Disease, I am really sorry. This disease can be incredibly difficult to endure, and I wish you weren’t experiencing symptoms. Please know that you are not alone in this.

(I want to preface this post by explaining that I am not a doctor and am not able to diagnose, prescribe a treatment plan, or give medical advice. The purpose of this post is to share insight gained from my own experiences.)

When I first realized that the symptoms I was experiencing could be Lyme Disease, I did a lot of research to determine the best course of action to take, but it wasn’t easy to find accurate information. There were conflicting opinions everywhere.

Often times, even if symptoms would suggest Lyme as a possible culprit, doctors don’t seem to recommend testing. I’ve seen stories of hundreds of people in Lyme Disease support groups who went to their doctors with a whole list of symptoms, but never did their doctors mention Lyme as a possible culprit.

At least once a week I get an email from someone who has stumbled upon the blog and thinks they may have Chronic Lyme Disease. They aren’t sure what to do for testing or treatment. Their doctors either have treated them with two weeks of antibiotics and said they were cured, or they were never even checked for Lyme in the first place. Now these people are at a place of being debilitatingly ill and unsure of what to do next.

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Emily Lofgren’s heart beats for authenticity. She craves true connection where we can be real about our struggles and find hope together. Emily became a Christian in college and since then has had a passion for writing in a way that helps others encounter life. Grab your free copy of her eBook Finding Hope Through the Fog.

What to Do When Others Don’t Understand Your Chronic Illness

What to Do When Others Don't Understand Your Chronic Illness

Dealing with a chronic illness that most people don’t understand can be isolating. It is discouraging when we can no longer live “normal” lives but everyone else we know seems to be living life as usual.

It gets even more sad when the people who should be closest to us, like family, seem to disregard the pain we’re experiencing.

For me, living with Lyme Disease is complicated because of the misinformation out there about the disease. There’s a big difference between early diagnosed and chronic infections. Like others with different chronic illnesses, Lyme Disease patients often need to try many different treatment protocols before they find something that works. Symptoms come and go, and pain migrates. It’s hard to explain how you’re doing when things can change drastically in a short period of time.

When I was first diagnosed and finally had names for the symptoms I was experiencing, I was always frustrated by the fact that others didn’t understand. I tried explaining, but it felt like I couldn’t express myself enough to make others recognize that I wasn’t able to live up to the expectations that had been formerly placed on me. I wanted people to know that I was sick and my life was a lot different than it used to be. It wasn’t easy to explain.

Over the past year and a half, I’ve learned a lot about explaining what I’m going through.

Here are a few thoughts on what to do when others don’t understand your chronic illness:

1. Accept that not everyone will understand

This was a hard one for me. I am usually effective at explaining my point, so I figured that if I shared information about my chronic illness that others would start to understand. But, I quickly realized that not everyone will understand, and I had to be okay with that. While some people may begin to see what we mean, we can’t expect that everyone will choose to learn enough to comprehend what we’re going through.

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Emily Lofgren’s heart beats for authenticity. She craves true connection where we can be real about our struggles and find hope together. Emily became a Christian in college and since then has had a passion for writing in a way that helps others encounter life. Grab your free copy of her eBook Finding Hope Through the Fog.

The Parts of My Chronic Illness You Don’t See

(The first time I posted this, it was shared on Medium.com, but I wanted to be sure to get it up on the blog as well.)

It’s easy to be a person on the outside, making assumptions. I get it. I’ve been there and am still there to some extent. We see what’s in front of us and formulate our beliefs based on our observations. It makes logical sense.However, when we judge the surface without understanding what’s going on inside, we fail to grasp the full picture.

Emily and Jonathan
One of the happiest times I had at the beginning of treatment! My boyfriend, Jonathan, came over and we ate dinner on the patio. I was feeling good as the antibiotics and supplements were kicking in right away — still had some physical pain, but was feeling great emotionally! What you don’t see is that just a few days later I was in deep depression and was about to give up on everything. Those who saw the happy picture on social media probably thought I was better, but in reality it was just a small moment of feeling better amidst a sea of hard days.

EVERY. SINGLE. DAY. I have other people make observations about how I look and then formulate opinions about how I must feel.

They then go on to tell me how I must be feeling based on my appearance. Some days, they are correct, but a majority of the time my outer shell doesn’t begin to express the pain beneath it.

Because I truly believe that most people are well-meaning, I try to brush it off. But, it’s not that simple. The neurological symptoms of Lyme have left me with crippling anxiety and depression. I get so anxious about what other people will think that I sometimes lie to myself and to them; I tell them I’m feeling well because those are the words they already put in my mouth. I submit to their opinions because I don’t want to be judged for still being sick.

This eats me up inside as I face other guilt because as a person of faith, I believe in honesty. I don’t want to pretend, but it feels like those around me want to put me into a box — a box I cannot seem to escape.

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Emily Lofgren’s heart beats for authenticity. She craves true connection where we can be real about our struggles and find hope together. Emily became a Christian in college and since then has had a passion for writing in a way that helps others encounter life. Grab your free copy of her eBook Finding Hope Through the Fog.